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What Do Brands Need To Know About Using Amazon Alexa?

"Voice is a new way for users to interact with your product," says Amazon's Noelle LaCharite. "Keep it simple and grow from there."

Even as Walmart rolls out voice-activated shopping via Amazon Echo’s Alexa and 40 million Millennials are ready to use Connected Intelligence-powered devices to order holiday gifts, most brands continue to wrestle with the implications of audio.

In a presentation at The LBMA’s Retail Loco in Atlanta last week, Noelle LaCharite, senior technical program manager for Amazon Alexa Machine Learning, offered some clear guidelines for how brands should navigate the use of voice-activation for marketing purposes.

Among her four-point outline for brands, LaCharite’s basic recommendations are:

Avoid Feature Creep. Keep It Simple. “Don’t overwhelm your users with features out of the box. Voice is a new way for users to interact with your product. Keep it simple and grow from there.”

As Natural Conversation As Possible. “Try to make your utterances as natural as they possibly can. Top Tip: Have a real world conversations with one another to create these.”

Core Business Functionality As A Minimum. “It’s important to do the fundamentals right. If you are a news company. Your users will naturally expect you to at least provide the news. Do the extra features later.”

Utilize The Built In Library. “There are hundreds of entities that Alexa can understand using the Built-In library. You can handle this in your skill by simply including them in your interaction model and respond with a useful response.”

GeoMarketing: What should brands know about Alexa’s capabilities as a marketing vehicle? Are you surprised at how much they know or how little they know?

Noelle LaCharite: People are not in a voice-first world yet. So, my goal is to be very aspirational in nature, and just expose the idea of “What would it look like if your brand thought about voice?”

The biggest question is what does your brand even sound like? It’s not something most brands have had to think about. But it’s actually there in some of the most well-known places. For example, most people know what the game show Jeopardy sounds like. You immediately have that tune in your head when the name is mentioned. You don’t have to explain anything. It’s almost common language, but it’s hard to put words around it. And yet, everyone immediately recognizes what it means.

You don’t even have to see Jeopardy. That’s what brands have to achieve now. Most brands haven’t even thought through what ear-cons are, those different sounds, chimes, audio signifiers that identify a brand without additional explanation. That is going to be so important for brands to grasp as consumers shift to a voice-first world.

Amazon Echo Alexa Dot

GeoMarketing’s Lauryn Chamberlain recently spoke to the BirchBox CEO Katia Beauchamp about the way the way Alexa has influenced the way consumers get information. So we’ll pose the same question we did to her: Does the rise of voice-activation call into question the need for a website, or the primacy of a website for brands?

The easiest thing for people to do to be successful is just to look at what are the top 10 things people do on their website. And some of them aren’t going to be top tier ranking. Some of them are going to be three clicks down or 10 clicks down. So find out what those are and make those your first things that you do. We call it the “minimum remarkable product.”

So now, brands are going to have to figure out what’s the most popular thing people are already asking for and make that a top-level indicator of intent in order to get the best interaction.

While Alexa is mostly thought of as powering the Echo in the living room or kitchen, it’s also there on your phone, in the Amazon app. Should brands be thinking of the way Alexa can tie on-the-go and at-home experiences together?

Right, Alexa on the Echo and on your phone within the Amazon shopping app is still the same Alexa.

As an example, one of my Alexa skills is daily affirmation and it’s you can do it while you’re shopping or you can do it sitting on your couch, and it’s the same experience. That’s that contextual experience we’re shooting for. So we want people to be able to say the same thing, the same way, whether they’re standing in front of their washer and dryer, in front of their fridge, or in the aisle of some store.

When we talk to retailers, there’s a lot of interest in using Alexa as a virtual sales assistant to help people while they’re browsing in a brick-and-mortar store. Do you think of those use cases as well?

From an aspirational perspective, absolutely. We’re not actively doing anything like that at the moment, but at the core, the Echo is a customer experience device. So how could you not only delight them in-store, out of store. Because someone already has Alexa on their mobile app, we’re always trying to imagine what could you do to make any brand that you either sell or associated with be more successful.

The challenge, obviously, is, with voice, if you’re in a crowded store, it’s difficult to kind of narrow down what one person is saying. Then you have to think about using voice remotes or a push button. One of the crazy ideas could be to create a phone booth that you step in and close the door.

That’s part of the brainstorming we’re constantly doing. The possibilities really are endless and that’s what’s so exciting about the emergence of voice activation.