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The Omnichannel Challenge: When It Comes To ‘Click-And-Collect,’ US Retail Lags

Not only are US retailers lagging with click and collect, they haven’t done a good job of advertising those offerings, says eMarketer.

As Amazon continues to open fulfillment centers to get orders to customers even faster, the offer of shop online and in-store/curbside pickup by U.S. retailers is far behind their global peers.

Only 29 percent of  major U.S. retailers offer click-and-collect services — a significant gap from the 67 percent of their UK counterparts, citing an OrderDynamics study of more than 1,000 retail websites.

The retail brands with at least 10 brick-and-mortar stores in the U.S., the UK, Australia, Canada and the three Nordic countries of Sweden, Finland and Norway. US retailers represented about a third of the sample.

Even more troubling than the comparative lack shop online, pick-up in-store offerings, the retailers that do have that capability aren’t doing a lot to let customers know about it.

Just 38.5 percent highlight shop online/in-store pickup on their homepage, versus more than half to two-thirds of retailers in each of the six other countries in the study.

“This means that the American retail environment is still in the early phase of omnichannel adoption,” the report said. Despite the US being a world leader in marketing, it said, it is the worst at advertising in-store pickup offerings.

One of the issues retailers appear to have is the disconnect between online and brick-and-mortar sales. Too often, retailers’ departments remain “siloed” into two areas.

For example, the study found that when it comes to free-shipping offers, the U.S. actually leads: 67 percent of US retailers offer free-shipping, compared to 55 percent in the Nordics region.

Walmart is even making free-shipping a big part of its e-commerce marketing effort.

Walmart SVP and CMO Tony Rogers speaking at at the ANA’s Masters of Marketing conference this week, discussed the retail giant’s forthcoming holiday advertising which highlights its free-shipping.

“Free shipping two-day for orders over $35,” said Rogers, Adweek reported, adding a dig at Amazon Prime’s subscription delivery program. “No membership fee because, you know, we just don’t think you should have to pay $99 a year for the privilege of free shipping.”

 

 

About The Author
David Kaplan David Kaplan @davidakaplan

A New York City-based journalist for over 20 years, David Kaplan is managing editor of GeoMarketing.com. A former editor and reporter at AdExchanger, paidContent, Adweek and MediaPost.