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Age of Amazon: Stores’ Lack Of Responsiveness Is A Prime Problem

“Customers fully expect for brands to engage at the speed of light,” says CMO Council SVP Liz Miller.

Pretty much all brand marketers agree that “responsiveness: the ability to source, understand and then quickly react to feedback, preferences and needs” is crucial to the delivery of an exceptional customer experience as expectations driven by Amazon and the on-demand economy have shaped consumers’ views.

But all too few can say that their businesses can meet those expectations.

In a CMO Council survey of 153 senior marketing executives (54 percent of whom are CMOs), 90 percent concede responsiveness is important, if not critical, to attracting and retaining customers and maintaining competitive viability.

However, only 16 percent of marketers feel their organizations are extremely responsive to the consumer, failing to make changes to products, packaging, services and experiences based on real-time consumer requests and feedback.

Is Anyone There?

The CMO Council study, The Responsiveness Requirement: Meeting the Consumer When and Where It Matters to Drive Growth, was conducted with Danaher Corporation’s Product Identification Platform companies, examined the level of success (or lack thereof) when it comes to responding “in the moment,” whether it is a physical or digital touchpoint.

“Customers fully expect for brands to engage at the speed of light—after all, it is exceptional customer experiences from brands like Amazon and Starbucks that have proven that rapid response, personalization and real-time (or near real-time) omnichannel engagements are possible at the push of a button or click of an app,” said Liz Miller, SVP of Marketing for the CMO Council. “This is engagement at the speed of digital, and the customer expects a similar level of responsiveness across all experiences, regardless of whether the channel is physical or digital.”

In general marketers feel they are able to respond or react to consumer feedback, requests, suggestions or complaints specific to marketing campaigns in less than two weeks — which to app-centric consumers may feel like a lifetime.

For the most part, 78 percent of marketers surveyed are able to meet that expectation, with 43 percent actually saying that they are able to respond to the consumer within 24 hours, effectively setting the expectation with consumers that responsiveness is possible.

In those cases, the averages are skewed by online interactions, which are naturally immediate. When it comes to brick-and-mortars, though, that’s when the problems of immediacy show themselves.

About 77 percent of respondents admit it can take up to 90 days to respond and react to customer feedback, suggestions or issues, with 36 percent needing up to three months to respond. In other words, the equivalent of several lifetimes as far as consumers are concerned.

Source: CMO Council

Among the solutions the CMO Council is proposing to spur marketers to ramp up their level of responsiveness:

  • Starting strategic conversations internally to bring product packaging and physical touches like POP displays and promotions into the customer experience dialogue. This isn’t just about printing and getting packaging made; it must be discussed as a critical touch in a multi-touch, connected experience.
  • Setting the expectation that procurement must act as a strategic partner and not just a cost-cutter. Together, marketing and procurement must identify vendors that can meet responsiveness goals, not just budgetary ones.
  • Demanding transparency. Marketers need to develop supply chain relationships that provide continuous data streams with the intentional goal of total transparency across the supply chain to track everything from creative iteration and collaboration to works- in-progress.
  • Broadening the meaning of omnichannel to including everything from social posts to product packaging. It is time to bring physical and digital together, if for no other reason than this: The consumer thinks of us as one brand—not a physical brand and a digital one.

“With recent great advances in digital media delivery, unfortunately, the capability to make changes to physical media has been a laggard,” says Joakim Weidemanis, Group Executive and Vice President, Product Identification at Danaher Corporation. “Many people simply don’t know what’s possible until they decide it will be so. Advances in technology today allow business leaders to demand more speed, higher quality and greater transparency from their partners and vendors than ever before. Even more powerful for global brands is that such technology is available all over the world.”

About The Author
David Kaplan David Kaplan @davidakaplan

A New York City-based journalist for over 20 years, David Kaplan is managing editor of GeoMarketing.com. A former editor and reporter at AdExchanger, paidContent, Adweek and MediaPost.